Indication

EVENITY™ is a prescription medicine used to treat osteoporosis in women after menopause who are at high risk of fracture, or cannot use another osteoporosis medicine or other osteoporosis medicines did not work well.

For women with osteoporosis after menopause at high risk for fracture

After EVENITY™

Talk to your doctor about how to keep the new bone you've built

Now that you've finished treatment, talk to your doctor about next steps

Since osteoporosis is a chronic disease, you'll have to manage it even after EVENITY™. If you don't continue to treat your osteoporosis, you will lose the bone-building effects of EVENITY™, causing your bones to weaken. Here's what you should consider doing next.

Two things to discuss with your doctor

1

Scheduling a
DXA scan

To see how EVENITY™ has helped build bone, ask your doctor if you can schedule a DXA (sometimes pronounced dexa) scan at the end of treatment.

A DXA scan measures your bone mineral density (BMD) and provides a T-score. This helps your doctor determine your fracture risk.

Your doctor will compare this new T-score with your pretreatment T-score.

2

Starting a follow-up
treatment

Now that you've built new bone with EVENITY™, it's important to maintain and protect your new bone.

Talk to your doctor about which follow-up treatment is right for you.

Antiresorptives, another type of osteoporosis treatment, help slow down the bone-removing process that weakens your bone.

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about EVENITY?

EVENITY can cause serious side effects, including increased risk of having a heart attack, stroke, or death from a cardiovascular (heart or blood vessel) problem. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency help right away if you have any of these symptoms: symptoms of heart attack, which may include: chest pain or pressure; shortness of breath; feeling light-headed or dizzy; or symptoms of stroke, which may include: headache; numbness or weakness in face, arm, or legs; difficulty talking; changes in Read More